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No-sew Rag Rug

Last post Sun, Oct 6 2013 11:54 AM by MarthaMFI2. 68 replies.
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  • Fri, Nov 28 2008 7:41 PM

    • Kim_150
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    • Green Bay, WI
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    No-sew Rag Rug

    I have a pile of old threadbare t-shirts that are too old to donate, and colorful underwear with the elastic worn out, and I've been thinking of making a rag rug. I've never sewed anything more than a button though, so I was excited to find these directions... has anyone tried this before?

    http://www.littlehouseinthesuburbs.com/2008/11/secrets-of-no-sew-rag-rug.html

    http://www.homesteadweaver.com/braidedrug.htm

    I like the way they look, but the instructions are a little hard to understand. I'm wondering if doing a traditional one with sewing might be easier. 

  • Fri, Nov 28 2008 8:14 PM In reply to

    • Edey
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    • Joined on Mon, Sep 10 2007
    • Los Angeles County, CA
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    Re: No-sew Rag Rug

    It's an interesting variation of a braided rug - but - I wouldn't want to stand barefoot on those knots.  I would think they would hurt. It wouldn't be that hard to sew the strips together. It looks more like a form of plaiting.

    Thanks for sharing the idea.  Edey

    Edey's Vintage and Current Needlework Blog

    Life is like a quilt - it is made beautiful from all the little pieces stitched together.

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  • Fri, Nov 28 2008 8:45 PM In reply to

    • Edey
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    Re: No-sew Rag Rug

    Twined Rug

     This is another version of a rug that can be made with scraps, and a frame can be made from scrap lumber. Edey

    Edey's Vintage and Current Needlework Blog

    Life is like a quilt - it is made beautiful from all the little pieces stitched together.

    Use a HandCranked tool, it doesn't need to be plugged in or charged up!

    Treadle sewing machines. Get a workout and save electricity all at the same time. Plus it can go anywhere, even outdoors!

    READ THE ARCHIVES! It'll do you good.
  • Fri, Nov 28 2008 11:54 PM In reply to

    Re: No-sew Rag Rug

    Kim- I have the same thing going on with some old uniform shirts.  This is what I have decided to do:  I found a latch hook rug kit at a garage sale that was mising the yarn so I got the rug canvas for 50¢.  I will cut up my shirts and pants in strips 3 to 5 inches long (I'm going to start with longer since I can always trim) by 3/4 inch wide.  I have made my own "latch hook" from a wire coat hanger since this material will be too thick for a regular latch hook.  Then I'm going to just go hooking.

    I also received in the mail today my book "Making Rag Rugs on Simple Frames."  I am going to have to really study that before I attempt any of it!

    re-tired 

  • Sat, Nov 29 2008 12:24 AM In reply to

    • Pat
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    • Joined on Tue, Mar 6 2007
    • Colorado
    • Posts 14,463

    Re: No-sew Rag Rug

    Kim_150:
    I like the way they look, but the instructions are a little hard to understand. I'm wondering if doing a traditional one with sewing might be easier. 
     

    They're interesting, but I agree, the instructions are a little hard to understand. I'd have to try it to see how it works. A simple braided rug is easier, and the sewing is more like lacing your shoes. Here's an article that explains braided rugs: How to make an authentic braided rag rug

     


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  • Sat, Nov 29 2008 3:17 PM In reply to

    • Gigi
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    Re: No-sew Rag Rug


     

     

    Create! Repair! Reinvent! Reassess!
  • Sat, Nov 29 2008 3:23 PM In reply to

    • Gigi
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    • Joined on Wed, Mar 28 2007
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    Re: No-sew Rag Rug


    Create! Repair! Reinvent! Reassess!
  • Sat, Nov 29 2008 3:27 PM In reply to

    • Pat
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    • Joined on Tue, Mar 6 2007
    • Colorado
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    Re: No-sew Rag Rug

     I've made braided, knitted, hooked and latch hook rugs, but never saw a prairie point rug that I'm aware of. Is there a picture online somewhere so we can look at one? 

    Gigi:

    For those who have crocheted rugs, which would be considered "no-sew," did you use yarn for the purpose, knits, or woven material?

    I don't crochet, but I've knitted rugs from both thick (rug yarn and other types) yarn and from woven/knitted material. Tshirt material works well, as it has the "give" of yarn and curls naturally if cut against the weave so that the raw edges don't show.  

     

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  • Sat, Nov 29 2008 3:31 PM In reply to

    • Pat
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    • Colorado
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    Re: No-sew Rag Rug

    Gigi:

     

    Pat:
    A simple braided rug is easier, and the sewing is more like lacing your shoes.

    I have considered using the t-shirts from my abandoned "crochet-a-rug" project  to make a t-shirt braided rug. I love hand sewing, but unless it is low stress (pressure) on my hands, I am not able to do it. I am considering machine sewing the braids together. Although it would not be authentic, it might work. You have had much more experience in this matter than I. What do you think? 

     

    I'm not sure about sewing the braids with a machine. I think it would make a tunnel between the braids, when they need to be even. That probably doesn't make sense, let me try again. When you lace a braided rug, your stitches don't draw or pull the braids out of shape and they don't flatten them where the seam is. I don't even know how you'd sew it on a machine without causing all of that to happen.

    Think of lacing your shoes. You go from one side to the other, pulling snugly but not tightly. That's all there is to it. Maybe you could lace it a little at a time? I do it as I go, that way I can see how the colors are working together and it's not so tiresome as doing it all at once.  

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  • Sat, Nov 29 2008 5:59 PM In reply to

    • Edey
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    Re: No-sew Rag Rug

    Gigi:
    I first saw the directions in "Piecework" describing directions that were printed during the depression.

    I have that issue of Piecework, it is in the March April 1997 issue.  They are called flower rugs in the article. They are pretty, and would very nice in an area that doesn't get much use, but IMHO would be expensive if made with newly purchased fabric. The project in the book calls for a total of 12 1/4 yards of fabric, which includes the backing fabric and the fabric for the different colors of the prairie points. The size of the rug is approx. 34 inches by 23 inches, according to the directions. At $2.00 a yard for sale fabric it would be $24.50 + thread, at $4.00 a yard it would be $49.00+. Making it with reclaimed or scrap fabric would be more frugal. 

    In the same issue are rugs made by the Amish called Schuhbutzer, or Fusslumpen, in which torn rectangular pieces are over lapped bottom to top and sewn down the middle, then the next row over laps the first. It is stitched to a backing. The edges are left raw and raveled, the purpose being to create more absorbent surfaces to clean off dirty shoes. Variations in the same article has long cut strips folded in half, then pleated as it is sewn down to the backing. It's a good use for worn out clothing, and if made with denim would probably last a very long time. Edey

     

    Edey's Vintage and Current Needlework Blog

    Life is like a quilt - it is made beautiful from all the little pieces stitched together.

    Use a HandCranked tool, it doesn't need to be plugged in or charged up!

    Treadle sewing machines. Get a workout and save electricity all at the same time. Plus it can go anywhere, even outdoors!

    READ THE ARCHIVES! It'll do you good.
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