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Disability is in practical terms a stage of life

Last post Mon, Jun 1 2009 12:53 AM by cheapChic. 33 replies.
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  • Mon, Sep 29 2008 3:28 PM

    Disability is in practical terms a stage of life

    Dear All, I suspect that Luvd_Lioness & Virginia Needlewoman & a number of others on this site would agree with me that disability changed their lives.  Actually, all of us who live long enough are likely to be disabled at some point.  For those who are disabled, what "fixes" have you tried?  What has been successful?  Have you experienced stigma because of your disability? 

    I find that a cheerful countenance helps a lot with getting aid.

    For the bipolar aspect of my multiple disabilities, I have experienced some employment discrimination.  It is so common in the legal profession that most lawyers with disabilities have solo practices, as I did.

    Yours in Him, Deb

    Officially Recognized Stretchpert in Government & Charity Assistance

    Proud guardian of Heart, a black female Miniature Poodle, a Psychiatric Service Dog

    Enter His gates with thanksgiving, His courts with praise; give thanks to Him, bless His Name. (Psalm 100)

    Yours in thrift, Deborah



  • Mon, Sep 29 2008 6:31 PM In reply to

    • dlw
    • Top 150 Contributor
    • Joined on Tue, Oct 23 2007
    • Posts 463

    Re: Disability is in practical terms a stage of life

    Dear Deb,

    I have some physical problems that impact my life, but so far minimally. However, my dh and I adopted our son when he was 3 1/2 months old. He will be 17 years old in November. He had Down Syndrome, Autism, Severe Sensory Issues, Apraxia, etc. So we experience issues on a daily basis, the toughest to deal with is ignorance on the part of others. By that I mean insensitivity and discmination. However, ds is a blessing from God and I wouldn't trade him for any other child on the planet.

    God Bless,

    Dl

  • Mon, Sep 29 2008 10:25 PM In reply to

    • gayla50
    • Top 10 Contributor
      Female
    • Joined on Mon, Sep 24 2007
    • Western North Carolina
    • Posts 8,491

    Re: Disability is in practical terms a stage of life

    I have MS and RA, dystonia , I am a diabetic. and have a few other things wrong with me, I have a ramp for the wheel chair our doors were made large so if I need the chair .

    one of my most important thing is my work table it at my level in the chair

    and my grabber to get thing up high or down low .

    Gayla

    Officially Recognized Stretchpert in Frugal Food and Cooking and in Slow Cooker Foods



    Purpose is what gives life a meaning
  • Tue, Sep 30 2008 12:42 AM In reply to

    • misscas
    • Top 200 Contributor
      Female
    • Joined on Mon, Jul 23 2007
    • Kansas
    • Posts 233

    Re: Disability is in practical terms a stage of life

    I developed schizophrenia 4 years ago.  I have been on disability for 3 and a half.  I am working part-time now.  I have found a job I can tolerate because it is too busy for the voices to bother me.  My accommodations include no 8 hours shifts as I can't go that long without the voices starting up and staying under $940 a month.  They are grudgingly working with me.  I was released from one job because I was told by my manager while we were alone at the termination meeting that no one with my condition could possbily work in this position.  I had made a mistake while my judgement was impaired because I was delusional.  I also had a string of absenses because of my depression.  I later found out FMLA would protect me from firing if I had a disorder that caused a lot of absences but I was not told that by our FMLA rep.  I have thought about suing but the statute of limitations has ran.  I have also told some of my employers about my health problem.  I was treated like a freak.  I have had to disclose my condition while in job interviews when I tell them I'm disabled and need responible accommodations.  I never get called back.  There really is a stigma at work in my community about people with mental illnesses and I have experienced it.

    I am medication compliant but so far it has not relieved my voices.  I lactate and my period stopped so I'm having the side effects though.  My only hope is to lose weight and the medication may become more affective.   

    Christine
  • Fri, Oct 3 2008 11:55 PM In reply to

    Re: Disability is in practical terms a stage of life

    Yes I am disabled hate using the word, I was in a car wreck in a 4 foot ditch the car was nose in the ditch I suffered I think they call it tbi I have some brain damaged from it also chronic depression with being a mild form of being biplor I have been disabled since I was a child mom does not talk about it, and yes out of work this discrimination part I should have slamed the book in my boss's nose he called me flackey now that hurt so since my dad worked with me in driving cars to an the sellers got ahold of the boss and gavew him the what for kind of thing I still drive a car now and then but I learned to pipe up my mouth telling them no Im not weird or flacke you take the anti depressaints and triliptol to keep the chemicial in the brain stable so I left my hubby aand doing much better after closing the bussiness of car titles but I learned every one is equel no body is perfect there is no such word in my book if we knew what perfect really is then we all are perfect then thats to me a fact or fiction thnks for letting me ramble on on life history...

    Have a blessed day

  • Sat, Oct 11 2008 11:30 PM In reply to

    Re: Disability is in practical terms a stage of life

     I have several disabilities, some psychiatric, some physical  I have only been able to work for a few months of my entire life.

    What I have found is that yes, disability changes us dramatically, and that I have to shift my focus, always mindful that I am who I am in the shape I am, then go forward to what I CAN do, perhaps quite different than what I want/though I could do.  

     

    I understand the stigma for sure. Finding work, even social life, participation in community activities is limited for me...and people as a rule ask "What do you do?"  I feel so uncomfortable at this, not really having anything to say back.

     

    I do write, though, have published, plan to do more.

    It is sometimes my thinking that disability makes one almost elderly at a young age, in many ways.  But it also gives us special insight and compassion.

  • Sun, Oct 12 2008 12:13 PM In reply to

    Re: Disability is in practical terms a stage of life

    seaturtle:

     

    I understand the stigma for sure. Finding work, even social life, participation in community activities is limited for me...and people as a rule ask "What do you do?"  I feel so uncomfortable at this, not really having anything to say back.

     

    I'm asked that a lot since I'm so young ... it always found a way to explain... normally it's relatives so not a big issue.

    seaturtle:
    It is sometimes my thinking that disability makes one almost elderly at a young age, in many ways.  But it also gives us special insight and compassion.

    So true.

    I'm not confused. I'm just well mixed. ~Robert Frost
    Laziness may appear attractive, but work gives satisfaction. - Anne Frank
    I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. Philippians 4:13

    Married my Blessing 10-16-10 :)
    Became an Auntie 12-10-10 :)
  • Sun, Oct 12 2008 9:16 PM In reply to

    Re: Disability is in practical terms a stage of life

     Just a thought:  I think we can feel a lot better when we accept ourselves as we are, and then love the people we are and be proud of how brave we are to deal with disability day afer day.'

    Not everyone can do that.  And it take a lot of strength, and it's counter-cultural for sure.

     Seaturtle

  • Sun, Oct 12 2008 9:41 PM In reply to

    Re: Disability is in practical terms a stage of life

    Any able-bodied person is one car accident away from disability--temporary (BTDT) or permanent. Employers will hire thieves and druggies repeatedly and deal with their predations and absenteeism without (much) complaint, but will not tolerate even the tiniest problem from the disabled.  E-businesses are becoming a solution for many partially disabled people, but they will be hard to start and fund in this bitter economy. 

    God bless your incredible intellectual strengths!

  • Sun, Oct 12 2008 10:37 PM In reply to

    Re: Disability is in practical terms a stage of life

    Everyone,

    I want to thank all of you who posted to this forum. It takes courage and grace and patience beyond anything to face disabilities everyday. I have some medical issues of my own, but I am the caregiver for a husband with mental and physical disabilities, a daughter with mental and medical disabilities, and a son with Down Syndrome and Autism. My daughter is the only one who does not receive disability payments. She works two mornings a week at an animal shelter about 50 miles from our home and stays with a friend overnight to cut back on the cost of gas. But there are many, many days when her IBS, headaches, chronic fatigue, and depression get to her and she spends a lot of time in bed. My husband has PTSD, degenerative bone and disc disease, fibromyalgia, depression, suffered a nervous breakdown 20 years ago, and has walked with a cane for 15 years. This downward progression started when he was 36 years old. He is looking at having to use a roller walker soon. We think that it may have stemmed from his exposure to Agent Orange while serving with the Marines in Vietnam, but he may not qualify for any compensation because he served his time aboard ship. He is what is called a Blue Water Veteran. We are looking into his service record for more information. He receives Social Security Disability on his former work record. Our DS son also receives disability on my husband's record. He attends a day program three times a week and loves it. He has gotten to the point where he can ride the transit bus back and forth without assistance and his program is also 50 miles away. I am constantly amazed and genuinely pleased by my son's progress and the days when my daughter is my daughter free from pain and pleasant to talk to. I count my blessings when my husband has a good day and is able to start and finish a small project or drive to a friend's house for a couple of hours, or play with our granddaughter. I have found over the years that I need to take each day on its own merit. If there is something that needs to be done that cannot wait for my husband to have a good day, I break the project down to its most important and basic part and he is able to accomplish that much. The rest can wait. My daughter goes to work regardless of how she feels because the animals need her and she needs them. And my son rarely has a bad day that cannot be made better by telling him I love him. 

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