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Fair Wages

Last post Tue, Jul 9 2013 5:33 PM by zohnerfarms. 11 replies.
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  • Thu, Jun 6 2013 8:16 AM

    Fair Wages

    We were recently shocked by how much fast food workers in Seattle want to see in income increases. Let's look at fair wage though.

    How much do you make? Is it a livable income and is it a common wage in the market for your type of work?
    $ Dollar Stretcher Community Manager $
  • Thu, Jun 6 2013 8:56 AM In reply to

    Re: Fair Wages

     I'm fortunate that I have a career that pays very well. I've worked for 34 years to get here, climbing "the ladder". I make $55 / hour (though that's salary for 40 hours and I often work many more hours than 40 per week and don't expect compensation for it). In San Francisco, we have a minimum wage higher than most places because of the cost of living - 11.73, I believe. What is considered a living wage (where a person can work one full time job and still support themselves and a family) and I think that is closer to $16 or so.

  • Thu, Jun 6 2013 10:00 AM In reply to

    Re: Fair Wages

    Lamuneca, what do you do for a living? That is a nice salary. I am near SF as well and happy to know the minimum has gone up to close to $12. This area is outrageously overpriced. I came here to comment thinking the minimum wage in our area was around $!0 and to say that at least $12 would be fair. Now I read it's already at just about that. It would be nice to see it higher but I doubt that doable. I wonder how long it would take to work up to a flat figure like $15. At this point it seems like self run domestic/business can offer more than some actual steady jobs can. However, it's not always reliable unless one has a very set schedule or way of working it all out. I have learned this from my Mom's recent job loss and self run business.
    I am unable to delete my account. Therefore, I have signed out and will not be returning. Please do not contact me here, I will not get the message. God bless you all.
  • Thu, Jun 6 2013 1:26 PM In reply to

    Re: Fair Wages

     My DD #2 and DS#3 make close to 15 an hour. DS#2 is on salary but normally works more than forty hours. He is at around $50,000 a year, not sure what htat works out ot by the hour.  Im self employed so it changes all the time, so is DH, Babs

  • Fri, Jun 7 2013 8:19 AM In reply to

    Re: Fair Wages

     Hi Again, I work in local government, managing analysts and doing project management. I think the California minimum wage is $9.79 or something like that and as I said within SF is higher and may get raised again. My daughter just got hired at a cheese steak shop in the financial district for $14/hr but not getting many hours. My other daughter drives a para-transit bus for a little over $16 and can get as much OT as she wants. I would like to say that working in food service is hard work and I think they deserve a living wage and health benefits for doing that hard work.

  • Fri, Jun 7 2013 9:40 AM In reply to

    Re: Fair Wages

    It would be REALLY GREAT to see more health, vision and dental benefits for workers of all sorts. There are too many labor intensive jobs that are way under paid with no benefits... paychecks get eat up by rent bills, transportation to get to work, food to survive to even make it to work and little extra for much else. Oh yes and tax deductions...
    I am unable to delete my account. Therefore, I have signed out and will not be returning. Please do not contact me here, I will not get the message. God bless you all.
  • Fri, Jun 7 2013 9:45 AM In reply to

    Re: Fair Wages

    I have a livable income. It is actually much, much below the common wage in the market for my type of work: attorney. But it is right in line with attorneys in government practice. I work for the State. Classmates of mine in private practice are making 2-3 times my annual salary (after 12 years) but I think I have a better work schedule and standard of living (IMHO, I'd trade salary for being home every single evening and weekends).

    Erika
  • Fri, Jun 7 2013 10:32 PM In reply to

    Re: Fair Wages

    lamuneca0325:
    I would like to say that working in food service is hard work and I think they deserve a living wage and health benefits for doing that hard work.
     

    I guess I am playing the devil's advocate here, because I totally do not agree.

    I worked in food service as I worked to pay my own way thru college, & working those jobs is part of the reason that I finished college!  Food service does not even require a high school education, & I do not agree it is "hard work" at all.  There is little to no accountablility on the job, and there is no liability either, for the worker. It is not meant to be a "career" - working food service is a means to an end.  Many of my co-workers did the least work possible, & still were paid the same wage as I was.

    If you raise the wages made & add benefits, then fewer people will be able to work, because the owners will not take a cut in their profits.  When I was working thru college, I was covered with the health insurance, that was required, thru the college.  Food service is a temp job, like many others.  It is not meant to be a career, altho it can help one get there thru education. I would not support either raising the ages or adding benefits.

     

  • Wed, Jun 12 2013 3:36 PM In reply to

    Re: Fair Wages

    zohnerfarms:

    I guess I am playing the devil's advocate here, because I totally do not agree.

    I guess this would be me, too. It seems like when I hear these type of "fair wage" arguments, the presumption is that the employers can pay more and they're just being "cheap" to put it in the most kindly terms.

    My father owned a business where he *could not* pay more, or he would have been out of business. The business was so marginal that went the government slightly shifted their policy and reduce the number of clients, he went into bankruptcy. Businesses have to be profitable to sustain themselves.

    Part of the high cost of living in San Francisco is actually a high minimum wage itself. If a no-education job that could be done by anyone is set at $11 when the market rate is $5, then by definition all wages will go up by the relative $6 to keep the market in balance. (Setting a minimum wage does not affect the supply/demand ratios of unskilled vs. skilled workers.) That creates inflation which increase the prices of hard goods. On the flip side, any service done by minimum wage workers will also have to cost more for the underlying business to see any profit. All of that translates to continuous cost of living spirals. (San Francisco has also instituted rent caps (the last time I checked) that discourage new landlords and building, also making the cost of living go up.)

    In addition, if an employer really needs (and can sustain) two $5 per hour workers, but can only hire one at $11, they choose to never expand at all because the math isn't working. There's a strong argument that minimum wages hurt the out of work uneducated work force at the expense of those who already have a job.

    Ultimately, IMO there's no such thing as a "fair wage" -- there's only the wage you can get for your services. (CEO pay is hardly "fair" relative to most workers.) Good employers are generous already as they know turn over and poor customer service is expensive. I think leaving businesses alone to set wages/benefits and dealing with social problems outside of the job realm is much more effective.

  • Mon, Jun 17 2013 9:49 AM In reply to

    Re: Fair Wages

    This is so true.  My boss cannot afford to pay any better than he does, so he offers additional and unusual perquisites to keep me.  In small towns where jobs are scarce, multinationals will pay minimum and still have people staying in those jobs for many years.  They can afford to pay better wages in order to get better and more promotable talent, but will not.  If people with disfigurements, or other socially stigmatized people,  must work for low wages, it makes sense to be a bargain for small businesses rather than to allow exploiters good talent for bad wages.  The flip side of this, is that these large companies are reducing overall wages, cutting benefits, increasing stress, and making small businesses more competitive for talent.  

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