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Stockpiling Tips

Last post Fri, May 18 2012 8:49 AM by Brandy. 15 replies.
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  • Sun, May 6 2012 9:02 PM

    • Brandy
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on Wed, Mar 28 2007
    • Saving in South Mississippi
    • Posts 25,145

    Stockpiling Tips

    As food and products get more expensive, stocking when there are deals to be had becomes so much more important to the frugal. What are the tips of the stockpiling/food stocking experts?

    1. Be sure you have space ready before you begin buying. You can not store more than you can comfortably fit in. You can put your husband's old recliner and his pool table on the lawn to make room for cans and toilet paper but he won't like it one bit. Better to plan for space that is convenient to access and safe for what is stored.

    2. Don't buy more than you can use. Be sure you keep track of when you purchase items and the expiration dates. I like to plan to keep a stock that gets me through the next sale for items that are routinely found on discount, myself.

    What are your tips for stocking up on food and products?

    The Dollar Stretcher Community Manager



  • Sun, May 6 2012 9:12 PM In reply to

    Re: Stockpiling Tips

    1. Only buy in bulk those items that you will use up before they go bad - paying a lower price per unit is not cheaper if you throw enough of it away to pay more in bulk that you would in smaller quantities
    2. Get rid of things you don't need to make room for things you can stockpile
    3. Learn to preserve foods in season for other times of year
    4. Grow your own - and trade for what you can't/don't grow
    5. Watch the dates - and know what they mean.  Best by / use by dates are guidelines - one of my cowrkers gave me several 12-packs of soda, and another coworker several cases, because they were past their "expiration date" and he was going to throw them out
    6. Invest in a decent freezer - and make sure you have somewhere convenient to put it, if you can't access it easily, items in the freezer will not get used in a timely fashion
    7. Investigate CSAs in your area
    8. Determine if a membership warehouse (e.g. Costco, Sams, etc.) is cost effective - and make sure you use the membership if you get it.  Consider buying items in bulk and splitting with friends if the per-unit price is low enough but you can't use it all at once (works for CSAs too)
    9. Cook from scratch (learn how if you don't know - it's easy!) - convenience foods are incredibly expensive.  Make double recipes, split the extras into convenient portions, and freeze them for later dinners or lunches
    10. Take your lunch to work (see #9)
  • Sun, May 6 2012 9:23 PM In reply to

    Re: Stockpiling Tips

    karenteacher:
    1. Only buy in bulk those items that you will use up before they go bad - paying a lower price per unit is not cheaper if you throw enough of it away to pay more in bulk that you would in smaller quantities
    2. Get rid of things you don't need to make room for things you can stockpile
    3. Learn to preserve foods in season for other times of year
    4. Grow your own - and trade for what you can't/don't grow
    5. Watch the dates - and know what they mean.  Best by / use by dates are guidelines - one of my cowrkers gave me several 12-packs of soda, and another coworker several cases, because they were past their "expiration date" and he was going to throw them out
    6. Invest in a decent freezer - and make sure you have somewhere convenient to put it, if you can't access it easily, items in the freezer will not get used in a timely fashion
    7. Investigate CSAs in your area
    8. Determine if a membership warehouse (e.g. Costco, Sams, etc.) is cost effective - and make sure you use the membership if you get it.  Consider buying items in bulk and splitting with friends if the per-unit price is low enough but you can't use it all at once (works for CSAs too)
    9. Cook from scratch (learn how if you don't know - it's easy!) - convenience foods are incredibly expensive.  Make double recipes, split the extras into convenient portions, and freeze them for later dinners or lunches
    10. Take your lunch to work (see #9)

    Very good points. For me, number 1 is especially applicable. For instance, I will buy butter when I find it on sale. It keeps well frozen and I use lots of it for cooking and baking. But I don't eat much fruit so I only buy one or two pieces at a time.

    Tuna is another I use lots of and Aldi's still sells the 6-ounce can. But, I don't like commercially canned soups. Find them tasteless and too salty, so I've got cans of chicken soup taking up shelf space.

    I cook almost everything from scratch except bread because fresh bread seems to do a number on me.

     

    It's what we've heard again and again...store what you use, and use what you store.

    budgetwise



    "I will praise thee; for I am fearfully and wonderfully made: marvellous are thy works; and that my soul knoweth right well." Ps. 139:14
  • Sun, May 6 2012 10:24 PM In reply to

    Re: Stockpiling Tips

    just because your family use alot of say BBQ sauce a month (1 bottle) don't buy 2 cases when you only need 12 bottles for one year.

    Inventory of household items and crossing items used off is key but better then that take the list with you to the store LOL.

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  • Sun, May 6 2012 11:08 PM In reply to

    Re: Stockpiling Tips

     Use a food saver or something similar to prevent freezer burn. It does no good to stock pile meats if they aren't properly wrapped. Also make sure you label packages placed in the freezer so you know what you have.
    Riley
  • Mon, May 7 2012 7:42 AM In reply to

    Re: Stockpiling Tips

    Great tips everyone! I'm loving these reads!

    - When you see a good deal buy in bulk. Check expiration dates (even if you can preserve the items longer it's still good to know) and be mindful about how much you actually need and will use.

    - Keep your stockpile well organized so you know where things are and do frequent inventory so you know what you have.

    - I like to organize my freezer shelves by food types. Example: I have a meat shelf, a soup shelf, a veggie shelf, etc. A dinner and a lunch shelf can come in handy for those who cook and freezer pull for reheat meals. This can also help those hubands and kids who don't cook and want to reheat something... Everyone was spot on about the importance of preventing freezer burn and also labeling freezer items. Make sure containers being used are freezer safe and state that on the package. Lids can come loose on non freezer safe containers. I had had this happen and freezer burn creeps in!

    - If you are stock piling something fresh with the intention of freezing what you know you can't eat while it's still fresh then freeze immediately after you buy. Don't wait and let it sit in the fridge until it's almost time to toss. Things can spoil faster than you think. Buy, divide, package and freeze.

    "Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime." ~Chinese Proverb~
  • Mon, May 7 2012 8:25 AM In reply to

    Re: Stockpiling Tips

    On the comment above about expired soads - they are not spoiled when they are past their expiration dates, but the taste can be "off".

    So my first tip is use up the oldest inventory first.

    Second tip is to remember that you may be able to repackage your items to fit the available space better. 

    Also, you can use freezer zipper bags to freeze meat, and it doesn't get freezer burned (at least not at my house). Just make sure you squeeze out the air before you seal it.

    Jill

  • Mon, May 7 2012 10:13 AM In reply to

    • hjdeth
    • Top 500 Contributor
      Female
    • Joined on Mon, Aug 22 2011
    • Atlanta, GA
    • Posts 72

    Re: Stockpiling Tips

    under the bed space makes great storage areas for canned goods.  Years ago I started sliding 12-pks under the bed, but found that I could only use the front side of my bed...things got lost in the deep dark back! 

    I was bemoaning this sad fact of life...all that prime storage space totally useless.  My uncle (retired carpenter) heard me and a couple weeks later he blessed me with what he called sliders.  Basically drawers with wheels that were the 15" wide and fit to the back of the beds.  Very simple...plywood bottom, short 2" sides and had drawer pull handles.  He made as many as I could use for each bed.  I have 4 under my queen bed and 2-3 under each of the kids' beds.  each has a BIG label on the front side to tell us what is in it.  hygiene, veggies, fruits, etc.  anything that will fit in the space AND won't spoil.

    The ones under my bed are at least 20 years old and have survived cross-country moves and rough teenagers!  My uncle passed several years ago, but I thank him again every time I 1) DON'T run out of something and can avoid those unplanned trips to the store or 2) find an unbelievable buy and can really stock up...like the 0.29 Degree anti-perspirant or the .15/can green beans and corn that had misprinted labels!

  • Mon, May 7 2012 11:41 AM In reply to

    • grame
    • Top 50 Contributor
      Female
    • Joined on Tue, Feb 22 2011
    • Kingdom of Callaway
    • Posts 1,950

    Re: Stockpiling Tips

    hjdeth:
    under the bed space makes great storage areas for canned goods.
     

    Great point.  The key for those with limited storage is to be creative.

    I declare to you that woman must not depend upon the protection of man, but must be taught to protect herself, and there I take my stand. ~Susan B. Anthony
  • Mon, May 7 2012 12:54 PM In reply to

    • MarthaMFI
    • Top 10 Contributor
      Female
    • Joined on Wed, Apr 16 2008
    • New Westminster, BC, Canada
    • Posts 10,850

    Re: Stockpiling Tips

    more points learned from experience! 

    *  learn your sales cycles in your area. for example I know kraft dinner will go on special bogo making it about .60 cents a box (nothing compares to kd lol) every few months so if I am out or low I know a sale is coming.  I have a lot of stores locally so that benefits me since there is always sales lol  I stock up on lunch snacks at back to school sales.

    * only buy what the family will eat or what they have proved they will eat long term...  learned that one the hard way.

    * love the discount bins and clearance sections.  love my local safeway for that :)

    Officially recognized Stretchpert in Hobbies and Crafts
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