Welcome to Dollar Stretcher Community Sign in | Join | Help
in Search

The Dollar Stretcher Community has a new home!

Feel free to read the great frugal living tips, ideas and discussions readers and community members have posted here. But if you'd like to post something or start a discussion, please click here to go over to our new community site and create an account.

Please contact Brandy@stretcher.com for questions about these forums.



Harvesting and storing potatoes

Last post Sun, Oct 16 2011 11:22 PM by seaturtle. 4 replies.
Page 1 of 1 (5 items)
Sort Posts: Previous Next
  • Fri, Oct 7 2011 1:52 AM

    Harvesting and storing potatoes

     I have a huge potato crop this year. Some are a pound and a half. Each plant (I have 12) is yielding lots. The last 2 I dug up had very thin skins - I tried to dig with my hands, but even when my fingernails scraped them in the soil, the flesh was explosed.

    I will have a lot to store, and they all have these thin skins. The rest of the plants still have green stems. I gather I should dig them if it's a deep frost.Otherwise, what do I do to thicken the skins, and how do I store them? The cellar is very damp.

  • Fri, Oct 7 2011 11:00 AM In reply to

    Re: Harvesting and storing potatoes

    If you store them covered in dirt they will last longer.

    Michelle in Northern Michigan

    "Those who would surrender liberty for security deserve neither" - Ben Franklin

  • Fri, Oct 14 2011 12:40 PM In reply to

    Re: Harvesting and storing potatoes

    I've got more potatoes right now than I can reasonably keep, so I've been cubing them up and pressure canning them.  They can be used in soups or stews, but, if I drain them well, I think I can fry them up before serving. 

  • Fri, Oct 14 2011 1:29 PM In reply to

    Re: Harvesting and storing potatoes

    seaturtle:

     I have a huge potato crop this year. Some are a pound and a half. Each plant (I have 12) is yielding lots. The last 2 I dug up had very thin skins - I tried to dig with my hands, but even when my fingernails scraped them in the soil, the flesh was explosed.

    I will have a lot to store, and they all have these thin skins. The rest of the plants still have green stems. I gather I should dig them if it's a deep frost.Otherwise, what do I do to thicken the skins, and how do I store them? The cellar is very damp.

     

    The reason your potatoes have thin skins is because the plant (& the potatoes) are still growing. Generally potatoes are not dug until later in the fall, well after a couple of killing frosts, but before the ground is frozen.  Do not dig them just because it is going to frost.  Let the frost kill the plants, then wait a week or two, while the skins thicken, then dig the potatoes.  If you want to dig some sooner, just step on the base of the plant & break the stem to kill it.  When we lived in Idaho, either the potato farmers sprayed the vines to kill them, a couple of weeks before harvest, or they pulled a contraption with a bunch of tires over the field to break the vines & kill them.  You can do the same thing to your plants by stepping on the stem.

    When you are ready to dig & store them, dig the potatoes & put them in a 5 gallon bucket or a box.  Do NOT wash them. They need to be shielded from light, or they will turn green & taste yucky.  You can do this by closing the top of the box, putting a lid on the bucket, etc.  Humidity is generally pretty high in a potato cellar, too, so the fact that the basement is damp shouldn't be too big of an issue, as long as the potatoes are in something dry, like a bucket or a box. You may need to set the box up on something to keep it off the floor if the floor is damp.

     

  • Sun, Oct 16 2011 11:22 PM In reply to

    Re: Harvesting and storing potatoes

     Thank you, everyone. I know what to do now for next year's crop. I was afraid they would rot: the ground is nonstop soaked these days.

Page 1 of 1 (5 items)

The Dollar Stretcher has a new community!

Feel free to read the great frugal living tips, ideas and discussions readers and community members have posted here. But if you'd like to post something or start a discussion, please click here to go over to our new community site and create an account.

About Us    Privacy Policy    Writers' Guidelines     Sponsorship     Media    Contact Us



Powered by Community Server (Commercial Edition), by Telligent Systems