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Electric Use on a Heater

Last post Sun, Jan 2 2011 10:08 PM by 3-dog family. 2 replies.
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  • Tue, Dec 28 2010 2:27 PM

    • Brandy
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on Wed, Mar 28 2007
    • Saving in South Mississippi
    • Posts 25,145

    Electric Use on a Heater

    A reader has a question on the use of a heater. Can you help?

     I am in the processing of ordering a energy saving space heater for my home. I would need around 1000 feet for the kitchen, living room area . I live in the South but the nights can get pretty chilly.  My  current electric bill statement indicates: days of service-33, total KWH -822, avg. KWH/day 24 cost per day $2.77 for Nov.2010. I am looking at purchasing one of the EP Heater 1483 watts advertisted on TV. However, my concern how much electricity will it take to run it. How do I calculate electric usage?
    HELP.  Please.
    Brenda

    The Dollar Stretcher Community Manager



  • Tue, Dec 28 2010 9:17 PM In reply to

    Re: Electric Use on a Heater

     There are sites on the Web if she Googles it, but they give formulae for calculating cost, which are kind of complicated. I think her best bet would be to call her electric company and give them the specs on the heater. A friend of mine uses an oil circulation one (electric) and says she pays about $30 a month in electric, but saves an enormous amount on fuel oil.

  • Sun, Jan 2 2011 10:08 PM In reply to

    Re: Electric Use on a Heater

    At 1483 Watts the heater will be drawing 12.4 Amps, which is a lot, so if she has a toaster or something similar on that same circuit she may find that it trips the circuit breaker.  (1483 Watts = 120 Volts x 12.4 Amps)

    1)  Divide by 1,000.  (1483 Watts = 1.483 kW)

    2) Multiply kW by expected # of monthly hourse useage for kWh.  Example:  1.483 kW x 40 hours/month = 59.32 kWh/month

    3) Multiply monthly kWh by cost of energy.  Example:  59.32 kWh/mo x $0.12/kWh = $7.12/mo

     

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