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Wild Galapagos tomato

Last post Sat, Mar 20 2010 10:25 PM by Andrea3. 2 replies.
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  • Wed, Mar 17 2010 10:18 PM

    • Andrea3
    • Top 500 Contributor
    • Joined on Mon, Oct 26 2009
    • Posts 58

    Wild Galapagos tomato

    Thought I'd pass this on to anybody who likes cherry tomatoes, and is trying to grow them in dry, rocky areas. 

    Try a variety called Wild Galapagos.

    I saw this seed for sale last year (from Underwood), and they were outstanding.  New York got hit hard by late blight last year, and eventually it showed up in my garden.  Most of the varieties I grew got hammered, including almost all the heirlooms. But this one managed to fend off the worst of the disease.  It produces so well that even if you lose some tomatoes, there are plenty left to take their place.  

    The tomatoes are yellow, and they're not huge like some of the hybrid cherry tomatoes.  If you just have a small area of good soil, the plants seem to stay more or less compact. But give them some compost and room for the roots,  and they'll grow 10 or 15 feet long.  Mine produced right up to the killing frost (late October last year).

    At the end of the seasonm pick them when they're pale yellow and let them ripen on the counter.  You'll have fresh tomatoes at Thanksgiving!

    Since they're not hybrids, if you keep them isolated, you can also save the seed from one year to the next. 

    I'm going to try them in one of those Topsy Turvey planters this year.  Seems like they'd be perfect for it.

  • Thu, Mar 18 2010 8:01 AM In reply to

    • babs
    • Top 10 Contributor
      Female
    • Joined on Mon, Apr 2 2007
    • Vermont
    • Posts 10,988

    Re: Wild Galapagos tomato

     Never heard of this variety. Im in S Vt and got hammered by the blight. I am doing tomatoes in raised beds this year. Suppose to help with blight because the water will drain better. Dampness adds to the blight problem. Cant decide about the topsy turvy thing. Have you tried it before? How did it work? . I have a small green house and will plant a few tomatoes in there. We have a local garden expert that writes newspaper articles and books. He says if you grow them in the greenhouse they wont get the blight. I missed my tomatoes last year. Babs

    Officially recognized Stretchpert in Prayer Circle
  • Sat, Mar 20 2010 10:25 PM In reply to

    • Andrea3
    • Top 500 Contributor
    • Joined on Mon, Oct 26 2009
    • Posts 58

    Re: Wild Galapagos tomato

     I haven't tried the Topsy Turvy myself, but saw a couple hanging from other people's porches that seemed to do really well--at least the plants were huge.  It seems a strange way for a plant to grow and be happy, especially since the container is plastic.  I'd have thought it would get way too hot for the roots in the summer, but I'll give it a try.  Also bought one of those Al's Flower Pouches to try.

    The blight was a real heartbreaker for a lot of folks down here.  Some commercial growers lost their entire crops--thousands of acres.  (I had no idea there were that many acres in tomatoes in NY).  Supposedly, it was brought up from the south in a shipment of plants that went to one of those "big box" stores (no word on which one).

    We're not really damp in this part of the state--lots of wind, though, and the ag folks say this particular disease is wind-borne.  It sure hit hard and fast.  One week, everything looked great (some of my tomatoes were the size of softballs). Thought I'd sneak by without getting nailed, but within a few days I'd lost almost every tomato.  The Galapagos was the big exception.  I managed to get some Al-Kuffa ones (these are from Iraq, sold by Baker Seeds) and a handful of Stupice.  

    If there's a Big Lots outlet store near you, try them first before you buy elsewhere.  They were selling a knock-off of the Topsy Turvy for just $7, and also had one for growing strawberries.  Dollar General was selling the real TT for $10, which is a whole lot less than the garden catalogs!  

     

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