Welcome to Dollar Stretcher Community Sign in | Join | Help
in Search

Schooling with a distraction

Last post Mon, Jun 15 2009 8:20 PM by Brandy. 5 replies.
Page 1 of 1 (6 items)
Sort Posts: Previous Next
  • Mon, Jun 15 2009 1:50 PM

    Schooling with a distraction

    My wife is a stay-at-home-mom who wants to homeschool our 5-year-old in the Fall.  However, we also have a 2-year-old running around the house. How is my wife supposed to give the eldest a true education when there is a huge distraction/attention-craving (but infinitely adorable) younger sibling in the picture?  I'm worried that #1 won't get the education that she deserves and will fall behind.

    Don't forget to get your free Web Site hosting package at: http://www.webstencils.com/freehosting
  • Mon, Jun 15 2009 2:27 PM In reply to

    • Toni B.
    • Top 25 Contributor
    • Joined on Sat, Apr 5 2008
    • Seneca Falls NY
    • Posts 3,826

    Re: Schooling with a distraction

    Truthfully it would require patience, structure and organization. The plus side is that the older one may want to share what she's learning with the younger one and the younger one will pick up on things quicker.
    BuckshotPA:
    How is my wife supposed to give the eldest a true education when there is a huge distraction/attention-craving (but infinitely adorable) younger sibling in the picture?
    Having the older sibling at home could be an opportunity for the younger child to discover she can't be the center of attention 24/7.
    Officially Recognized Stretchpert in Stages of Life
  • Mon, Jun 15 2009 2:31 PM In reply to

    • babs
    • Top 10 Contributor
      Female
    • Joined on Mon, Apr 2 2007
    • Vermont
    • Posts 10,988

    Re: Schooling with a distraction

     I home schooled 5 that were spread out over 20 years. The younger ones learned a lot more and a lot earlier than the oldest. You have to remember that home school doesnt have to be on a strict time schedule. One of my kids did night school. He needed quiet to concentrate. Also Dads can do a lot when they are home. Another thing , in schools, there is a lot of time spent doing things that dont happen in homes. Your not going to walk to the library, gym, lunchroom. You arent lineing up and waiting for 18 kids to go potty or get their coats on for recess. The actual learning time is not that much. Babs

    Officially recognized Stretchpert in Prayer Circle
  • Mon, Jun 15 2009 5:26 PM In reply to

    Re: Schooling with a distraction

    **Disclaimer**  This is not meant to offend anyone who doesn't homeschool their children.  This isn't meant to offend any teachers on DS who work very hard to educate the children of this country.  This is my opinion based on my family and our situation.  This isn't meant to insinuate that if you don't share my views that you are wrong and I am right.  This is simply just how my husband and I choose to educate our children. 

     I am a SAHM to a 6, 4 and 2 yr old.  I've been homeschooling for two years now.  It takes some creativity and planning to homeschool with little ones at home, but it's definitely doable.  As another posted stated it would be no different than in a traditional classroom as the teacher is dividing her time and attention between multiple children, many more than your wife would be.

    When we do school, my youngest sits at the table and colors, plays with legos or small manipulatives.  If he's not into sitting still or is too noisy, he goes out in the living room to play with special "school" toys that he only plays with while I'm doing school with the other kids.  Since they are special toys that he normally doesn't see they hold his attention longer.  Sometimes we'll do some school as the youngest is just starting or finishing his nap.  I've also included him, especially if we're doing something kinestetic or hands on, he loves it!  My youngest has a much better vocabulary, is more interested in school and loves to participate with the other kids.  I honestly think it's because he's modeled a fun, hands on environment in which to play and learn.  He asks me to do school right along with the other two sometimes:)

    The absolute beauty of homeschooling is that it's not cookie cutter.  It's not one size fits all.  You custom tailor the activities, environment, schedule to your families needs.  It teaches your children flexibility, creativity and how to go with the flow.  I love it, I am blessed to be able to stay home with my kids and teach them.  I think it's awesome that your wife wants to give up so much in order to teach your daughter.  It's a huge sacrifice on her part.

    One thing to also keep in mind is that you can use so many "non-traditional" opportunites as teachable moments for your daughter.  Your wife can teach her when they are at the park, at the store, at the post office, at the doctors office, at the library, the list goes on and on.  Would a traditional classroom take a bunch of Kindergarteners to the store to teach them about volume, capacity, weight and measures?  Your wife can.  She can make the lesson "come alive" for your daughter and use real life experiences to cement in the objectives she is trying to teach. 

     I am not going to lie, I'm obviously biased.  I am pro-homeschool, no doubt about it.  I went to public school for K and 1st, hated it.  Went to perochial school 2nd through 8th grade, liked it.  Went to public high school, hated it.  I had no intention of homeschooling my children.  But once my oldest son was approaching school age, I was concerned about putting him in school and what type of education he would recieve.  I was concerned if the teachers would be willing to invest the time, energy, patience, and if they could.  Could I expect them to do that for him, when they have other children they are responsible for teaching?  What would happen if they didn't? 

    My Mom homeschooled 4 out of 6 of us (myself and one other sister went to traditional school) and the four that are homeschooled are flourishing.  One has a Masters, two are in college and doing great (both made the dean's list as a matter of fact!) and the youngest is in high school.  Three of them are "special needs" one of which has high functioning autism.  Was their education similar to other kids?  No.  My Mom taught one of my brothers how to write his name in pudding because he lacked the hand strength to write his name with a pencil.  Now he's writting college essays.

    Think of what you and your wife want your overall goals for your children to be.  What do you want their education to give them?  What is essential that they learn?  How do you want them to learn it?  What is important to your family?  Can those goals be obtained by a "traditional" classroom?  Really ponder that before making a decision.

    If all else fails, think about homeschooling on a trial basis.  Commit to one year, re-evaluate at the end of the year.  Give it time, see what happens.  Give your wife a chance to see what she's able to accomplish.  Give your daughter a chance to learn something.  Give your little one a chance to learn how to keep themselves entertained or join in the fun!  GIve yourself credit for being open-minded and flexible enough to even give the homeschooling thing a shot!

    Heather in CA
    http://storingupmytreasures.blogspot.com/
  • Mon, Jun 15 2009 6:31 PM In reply to

    • Toni B.
    • Top 25 Contributor
    • Joined on Sat, Apr 5 2008
    • Seneca Falls NY
    • Posts 3,826

    Re: Schooling with a distraction

    mommatothree has brought up some important ideas.
    mommatothree:
    One thing to also keep in mind is that you can use so many "non-traditional" opportunites as teachable moments for your daughter.  Your wife can teach her when they are at the park, at the store, at the post office, at the doctors office, at the library, the list goes on and on. 
    This afternoon I was at our local Mennonite store and I overheard a conversation a woman was having with her two daughters. One daughter was saying she couldn't decide between one of three items and her mother corrected her and said "You can'" decide amongst three items - Between means you have two choices, amongst applies to more than two items". I went over to her and said "Thank you for teaching your children proper English". She was ecstatic that someone noticed her efforts and she proudly announced that she home-schooled her children.
    mommatothree:
    I went to public school for K and 1st, hated it.  Went to perochial school 2nd through 8th grade, liked it.  Went to public high school, hated it.
    I attended parochial school K thru 11 grade and in my senior year, attended public school. Looking back, I appreciate the quality of education I received. The bar was very high and when I got to 12th grade, it was like a vacation in comparison.
    mommatothree:
    As another posted stated it would be no different than in a traditional classroom as the teacher is dividing her time and attention between multiple children, many more than your wife would be.
    My sons attended public school. In Kindergarten, my youngest son craved attention and was labeled a "social butterfly". Eighteen years later that attention craving is not so endearing at times. Hence my comment about not being the center of attention 24/7.
    Officially Recognized Stretchpert in Stages of Life
  • Mon, Jun 15 2009 8:20 PM In reply to

    • Brandy
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on Wed, Mar 28 2007
    • Saving in South Mississippi
    • Posts 25,145

    Re: Schooling with a distraction

     I agree with Heather and Babs that homeschooling does not have to be operated like a public school. Many homeschoolers only use four hours of the day for actual school time as so much is cut out like bussing time, recesses and the time taken to work with many students. The schooling time can be broken down into shorter segments with breaks in between for younger children who still have short attention spans such as five and six year olds may.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that children are being exposed to education and learning basics at early ages. If they do miss something and many do even in public schools then those things are reviewed at later points and also taught at a more advanced degree in later grades. If the schooling is consistent and your wife does reviews and monitors progress then your children will likely learn at a decent pace.

    I second the tips for using special items for a younger child during school time to amuse them. It worked for my children most days. I also took advantage of naps for the things my oldest needed the most concentration on or the most attention from me for. 

     

     

    The Dollar Stretcher Community Manager



Page 1 of 1 (6 items)
About Us    Privacy Policy    Writers' Guidelines     Sponsorship     Media    Contact Us



Powered by Community Server (Commercial Edition), by Telligent Systems