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Making Butter

Last post Sun, May 10 2009 10:07 AM by Pat. 12 replies.
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  • Thu, May 7 2009 7:39 AM

    • Brandy
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    Making Butter

     In another discussion Pat said, " ... I make butter from the real milk I buy". Does anyone else make their own butter?

    How difficult is it to make butter from the cream off of milk purchased? Does a gallon of milk really produce enough cream for this?

     

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  • Thu, May 7 2009 7:47 AM In reply to

    • babs
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    Re: Making Butter

     I have made butter but only from store bought cream. It is easy to make. More cream in a jar with lid. shake, shake , shake until the butter separates from the milke. If you shake too long , you will have whipped cream. You more off the milk,, this is buttermilk. You can save and use in pancakes or biscuits. You wash the butter in cold water to remove the rest of the milk. This will take a few times in water. The cold also hardens the butter. You can add slat if you like it. If I remember correctly, the shelf life is shorter than store bough butter. Hopefully someone with more recent experience will add to this. A few years ago, we could get heavy cream free or cheap at a discount store. I made a lot of butter then. It is a fun thing to do with kids even if you have to buy the cream. 

    Pat add you experience with fresh milk and butter,,,,,please, Babs 

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  • Thu, May 7 2009 7:51 AM In reply to

    • Brandy
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    Re: Making Butter

     

    babs:
    I made a lot of butter then. It is a fun thing to do with kids even if you have to buy the cream. 

     I have access to non-homogenised milk at the local grocery store. Lately, I was having trouble getting it fresh enough but on my last trip I noticed they had restocked so perhaps whatever supply issues they were having are over. I had also been passingon this milk due to cost but if I can roll my cost of milk and butter into one price, that makes it easier on the budget.

     

     

    The Dollar Stretcher Community Manager



  • Thu, May 7 2009 7:53 AM In reply to

    • babs
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    Re: Making Butter

     That makes sense . Then you know that the butter is fresh. I really dont remember how much butter a pint makes. Then if you use the buttermilk in baking that also is a frugal thing too. Maybge you just need to try in when you have the money. See how much butter it makes.  Hopefully someone else will jump in here with some ideas or facts. Babs

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  • Thu, May 7 2009 7:54 AM In reply to

    Re: Making Butter

    My grandmother taught me to make butter from fresh cream. I've made it from store bought cream. The only differance is I knead the butter to get the milk out of it instead of rinsing under water. Eather way it is a good experince for everyone involved.

    Nettie

  • Thu, May 7 2009 8:06 AM In reply to

    • Pat
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    Re: Making Butter

     Whether a gallon of milk will provide enough cream to bother making butter depends on several things, usually out of your control: type of cow, type of feed she eats, how the milk is handled (some raw milk dairies skim the cream off).  If you can get milk that has enough cream in it, first you have to let it set for at least a day without disturbing it. It has to be in a container with a large enough mouth so you can skim the cream easily. Put the cream in a jar (don't fill the jar more than halfway) with a good lid and let it set at room temperature at least a half a day. If the cream is too cold, butter won't make easily; it should be just a tiny bit cooler than lukewarm. Put the jar in a bowl of hot water if it's cool in the house. 

    Fasten the lid tightly and shake or bounce it until you can see the butter gather. First the cream will seem to thicken, then it will thin and you'll see tiny flecks of butter sticking to the side of the jar. Keep shaking until these flecks gather into one lump. Drain the buttermilk into a container to keep and put clear water into the butter, wet a wooden spoon and stir and work it to rinse the remaining buttermilk out, then drain it off. Do this several times until the water is almost clear, then put the jar on it's side, tipped just a little, and allow it to drain for a half hour or so. Using the wooden spoon again, get all the water out that you can, salt the butter and put it into a container for the refrigerator. The salt will keep it fresh longer. 

    It's easier to do than it is to explain! If the temperature is right, it should take about 10 to 15 minutes of shaking for the butter to form. The reason you work it with a wet wooden spoon is that butter won't stick to it as much as it does a metal one.  When you rinse the butter, use water as near the temperature as the butter was churned to keep it from getting cold and breaking apart or getting too soft to work. It keeps a couple of weeks in the refrigerator and can be frozen if you have an excess. A pint of good cream will make about a cup of butter, if that helps - but it varies according to the cream. 

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  • Thu, May 7 2009 8:28 AM In reply to

    • Brandy
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    Re: Making Butter

     

    babs:
    Then if you use the buttermilk in baking that also is a frugal thing too.

    I do bake and make foods from scratch often but I have avoided the ones that call for buttermilk due to the price. Buttermilk in the biscuits or waffles does sound good. 

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  • Thu, May 7 2009 8:30 AM In reply to

    • Brandy
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    • Joined on Wed, Mar 28 2007
    • Saving in South Mississippi
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    Re: Making Butter

     

    Pat:
    The reason you work it with a wet wooden spoon is that butter won't stick to it as much as it does a metal one

    Well that's good because I don't have metal spoons. I use wooden spoons and some plastics for specific things like spatulas.

     

    The Dollar Stretcher Community Manager



  • Sat, May 9 2009 5:55 PM In reply to

    Re: Making Butter

    Pat:
    Put the cream in a jar (don't fill the jar more than halfway) with a good lid and let it set at room temperature at least a half a day. If the cream is too cold, butter won't make easily; it should be just a tiny bit cooler than lukewarm. Put the jar in a bowl of hot water if it's cool in the house. 
     

    DD makes butter from the milk from her goats.  She sets the milk to cool in the fridge, then skims off the cream after a couple of hours & puts it in a wide mouth jar in the freezer. When the jar is full, she moves it to the fridge until it thaws & makes the butter. It is not sufficient for all their needs, but she only has a couple of goats & 4 children, so every bit helps. The kids like the goats milk better with the cream removed anyway. She uses cold water to wash the butter, & she uses it in baking.

  • Sun, May 10 2009 1:00 AM In reply to

    • Pat
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    • Joined on Tue, Mar 6 2007
    • Colorado
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    Re: Making Butter

     I've never made it with goat's cream, but goat milk doesn't have as much cream as cow's milk, does it? I know you can make cow's butter with cold cream, but it takes longer to make and doesn't keep as well. You wash the butter in whatever temperature you churn it. Cold churning is harder all the way around with cow's cream, but I don't know if there's a difference with goat's cream. 

     Edited to add: Also, with cow's milk, the longer it sets (within reason) the more cream comes to the top. 24 hours is usually the ideal amount of time.

    I've been making butter every time I got the chance since I was a kid, about.... let's say 50 - 60 years ago. Smile but never used goat's milk.  Daddy milked two cows and we always had milk, butter, cream, cottage cheese, and so on. Then when my husband and I were raising our family, I milked a cow myself when he couldn't, and made the same things. Now I buy raw milk because this silly city won't let me have a cow in the back yard and I make the same things - butter, cottage cheese, yogurt, cream cheese, ricotta cheese... 

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