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Thrifty Living Today
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Thrifty Living Today

  • A woman who started her own business

      I was walking through our very large local grocery store. Many people were shopping. As I pushed my cart up and down the walkways, I spotted several women displaying different food products. They were positioned at small tables in the middle of the largest aisle.  

    One lady was setting up jars of jam, and offering shoppers samples of the product. Appearing very efficient, she explained the jam was made with fruit and a small amount of jalapeno pepper. Visitors were given a choice of mild, medium, or hot jam on crackers. I chose mild, brought the sample to my mouth, and swallowed. 

    Suddenly I started coughing. I decided to stay near the table for a few minutes while recovering. The woman gave me a small amount of sour cream and suggested I put some in my mouth. “It always helps when people start coughing.” she said. It took a few minutes but the coughing gradually stopped. 

    No other shoppers were at the table. I asked who made the jam. She responded saying “I created the jam” and proceeded to tell me the contents. 

    Our conversation shifted on to other topics. She shared a bit of her history.  

    A few years ago, she lost her job and found it difficult to find another. She had been processing jam for twenty-fife years and wondered whether she could do anything with that talent. 

    Finding information about jam was imperative and time was spent scouring the computer for information. As days went by she found herself on the computer up to sixteen hours.. More time was spent studying processing, passing government requirements, and finding an appropriate kitchen. After a while, she passed the government statutes, and got off the ground.  

    Next, she looked for places to sell her jam. 

    The big box grocery stores were the first target. Those approached had no interest in taking on a fledgling jam producer. 

    Much smaller stores provided people who would listen.  

    Gradually, stores began selling her jam. 

    She continued learning and making a better item. 

    Since that time, our supplier has learned and improved her product.  

    Instead of sitting at home watching television and wringing her hands, she has spent her time working to build her business and to improve her life. 

    Before I left the table, I told her I was proud of her. 

    What would do if you suddenly lost your job?  

    Do you have talents waiting? Would you have the energy and drive to start a new career? 

    I hope this does not happen to you. But, it does happen to many people. Those who have talents, thoughts, incentive, may be able to create a new business. 

    If you have faced this I invite you to write a comment. Maybe this will help another person facing this.  

    Lori Blatzheim 

  • What I learned, participating in an Indoor Garage Sale.

     

    Have you ever heard of an Indoor Garage Sale?..... Neither have I.

     

    It took a while to warm up to the idea but, after considering the concept, I decided to participate in one planned for our community.

     

    Our local Recreation Center advertised through the local newspaper, cable television, internet e-mails, and street signs. Garage sale information and a map were also made available.

     

     

    My husband got wind of the idea. He had been discussing the large amount of non-used material residing in our basement, and what could we do with it all. We made a visit to the lower level of our home and realized the indoor sale might be a way to send items to a different home.

     

     

    I decided to phone the Rec. Center and sign up for a table at the upcoming sale. This resulted in a new status. I was now a Vendor for the upcoming event.

     

     

    O.K. so what is an Indoor Garage Sale? And, what on earth does a person with that title do?

     

    The representative from the Rec. Center sent potential Vendors well written information on what was expected from us. Here are some of the topics they presented:

     

    Vendors would be allowed to set up on either Saturday, from 6-8 pm or on Sunday, at 10 am.

     

    The sale was to begin at 11:00am sharp!

     

     

     

    There were Rules. These stated:

     

    ·  Exhibitors will receive one 6 foot table and a chair to display items

    ·  Tables will be labeled with your name and number

    ·  Doors will open to the public at 11am.

    ·  The sale runs from 11am-2pm.

    ·  Vendors are responsible for their own monies and change

    ·  No alcohol, illegal items or weaponry is allowed on site

    ·  Vendors are required to remove all unsold items at the end of the sale

    ·  Vendors have until 3:30pm on Sunday to remove their items

     

     

    We were assured that, in case there were items not sold; Goodwill would pick up any unwanted merchandise at 3:15pm on Sunday. There was to be a location designated for donations.

     

     

    Where to start when you have less than a week to gather items you no longer want or use?

     

     

    I must confess to never having been a Vendor in the past. Questions ran through my mind. Here are examples:

     

    ·        How would I get the items into the building and where was the room?

    ·        Would other Vendors help?

    ·        Would I be able to place everything on the table?

    ·        How much and in what denominations of coins and paper money, should I bring?

     

    It turned out that my husband was available and took a lot of time helping me. He also selected items to sell, organized and placed the objects. He came up with great ways to carry the items into the Rec.Center and to take them home again.

     

    We had one very unusual item, a large box of greeting cards. These had been given to us by a friend who knew they could be used to make holiday cards. The card backs had been removed but the box was filled. I wanted to know if anyone would take cards for future use. I was hoping they would offer some of these for art projects.

     

    I had opportunities to meet with other Vendors before and during the garage sale. Several had never tried selling at this type of sale. Others, more confident, were helpful with information. All were very receptive.

     

    What surprised us:

     

    ·        Most shoppers looked at my display,

    ·        Customers met and spoke with me.

    ·        Each asked the price.

    ·        All wanted a lower price.

    ·        All bargained.

    ·        Some wanted to take a portion of an item.

     

     

    I did sell a small number of things. These included:

     

    ·        A wall mirror

    ·        A small picture

    ·        A large coffee holder

    ·        Leather gloves

     

    Unfortunately, no one wanted any of the cards.

     

    Thinking they could be recycled, I offered them freely to everyone at my table. They could be used by children making art projects, but no one would take them.

     

    Would I do this again? I’m not sure. It was a good experience and I learned a lot. Ask me next year.

     

    Best wishes to all of you who participate in yard, garage, and estate sales. You are helping the recycling effort.

     

     

    Lori Blatzheim

     

    Lori Blatzheim is a wife, mother, grandmother, writer, thrift advocate, cable television producer, and retired nurse. She knows that use of Thrift can help people because she has experienced the benefits.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Online greeting cards are much less expensive than those sent by mail.

    I haven’t crossed the bridge yet and continue to send cards through the postal system.

    However, I have found a way to reduce the cost of the cards.

     

    Our family has been saving greeting cards for a number of years. I have reasons for doing this. Here are some:

    ·        Looking through old cards reminds us of people we knew long ago. Some of them have passed away and others have moved to a now forgotten address.

    ·        The cards are lovely.

    ·        I don’t feel it respectful to toss them in the trash as soon as the major event has passed.

    ·        Cards represent thoughts of people who once spent time sending them to us.

     

    What has been done with the saved cards?

    There is a special area in a closet where old cards are kept. As the late fall and winter holidays draw near they are brought out and placed on a table.

    The cards are divested of their written words. Those with beauty, interest, or humor on the front page are kept for another trip through the postal system.

    Card stock and sticky circles are used to put new cards together.

     

    The inside of the card is blank. Something must be done.

    A message must be included. It doesn’t have to take up all the space but we hope it appears sincere and appropriate.

    This takes time and thought. We include a reference to the Holiday and our hope that they have a happy experience. We share some of our activities and plans.

    As I write on the inside of the card, I think of people who will receive it. I remember times we have been together, our families, our children, and what our friendship has meant to us.

    At the end, we slide the card into an envelope and address the exterior.

    The card will be sent on; to a place we might not know, on a plane or truck that will carry it to a different destination.

    We are linked together in memory.

     

    Lori Blatzheim 

     

    Lori Blatzheim is a wife, mother, grandmother, writer, thrift advocate, cable television producer, and retired nurse. She knows that use of Thrift can help people because she has experienced the benefits.

    Are you a Senior? Do you have a friend or relative who is considering retirement or has already retired? Check out this web site: Retire and Renew:

    http://retireandrenew.com

     

     

     

     

     

  • Finding Fiscal Literacy for University and College Students

     Are prospective students ready for University or College when they arrive?

    Consider some things they have to learn:

    ·                Location of all major dorms, buildings, classes, stores, and environment

    ·                Obtaining books and supplies

    ·                Meeting roommates, instructors

    ·                Attending classes and Learning expectations for the coming year

    It takes a while for students to come to grips with living on their own.

     

    Learning to handle finances while a student.

    All students have to manage their financial assets. Those who have been working for money, saving a portion of their income, and budgeting their assets, may have a head start.  But, there are students who have not had experience to do all the above.

    Does anyone help the student? Is this information available at the University or College they attend? How can they find help?

     

    “Live Like a Student Now”

    A few weeks ago, I was reading a metro newspaper, the Star Tribune,  and stumbled on a very special column. The title was “U gives lessons in living like a student”. This was written by Maura Lerner, the higher education reporter, for the Star Tribune. It appeared in a column, “On Campus”, http://www.startribune.com/local/229015791.html

    I knew immediately that she was referring to the University of Minnesota and that it had something to do with money and how it is spent. I wanted to know more.

    I learned that staff of the University of Minnesota offer a thirty minute crash course in money management. One staff member Nate Peterson, Assistant Director of the U’s One Stop Student Services, offers advice on how students can make the most of their money.

    I was stunned. I had never heard of a University or College offering this opportunity. I decided to contact Nate Peterson and asked him to contribute to this post.

     

    I asked him questions and he gave me answers.

     

    1.     Who determined that students of the University of Minnesota needed more information on fiscal literacy, the students and/or the staff?

    a.     With student debt continuing to grow across the nation, staff members from the University of Minnesota put together financial literacy outreach efforts to help students understand finances in all aspects of their lives. 

     

    2.     Who put the program together?

    a.     The Welcome Week program is put together by a team that includes One Stop Counselors, communications and graphics specialists, and students.

     

    3.     How long has the program been available to the students?

    a.     The program (in its current form) has been offered to students for more than 3 years.

     

    4.     How do you find your students, by conversation, discussion, observation, advertisement, or questions from the students? Is there another way?

    a.     The presentation is given to students as part of the welcome week program.  We work to educate students about smart financial decision.  The content is reviewed each year but students and staff to ensure we are hitting on relevant topics.  Each year, we have the opportunity to present to over 5000 new students.

     

    5.     Is there a cost for the crash course or ongoing program?

    a.     There is no cost for students to attend our events.

     

    6.     How do you determine whether the students benefit from the class? (Is there a way?)

    a.     At the conclusion of Welcome Week, students are given an evaluation, where questions are asked about the effectiveness of the program, content, knowledge gained, and satisfaction.  We inform are practice based on these responses.

     

    7.     What do you think is the most important information that you can share with students?

    a.     Decisions in spending are in their hands.  They have the power to make decisions about discretionary spending and credit that can impact the rest of their lives.  The sooner they are able to educate themselves about finances, the better. 

    8. Which techniques seem to work the best?

           It all depends on the learning style of the students.  Sometimes, our students like to learn on their own, and in that case the internet is the best option.  Our digital signage is a quick way for students to get a nugget of knowledge that they can hopefully apply in their worlds.  Classroom presentations are valuable in that we are directly working with students and can tailor the information to their needs.

     

    If you have any thoughts, suggestions, or information you think I should include, let me know what it is?

           Live Like a Student is an ever-evolving financial literacy outreach tool that utilizes student feedback and growing national trends to help students learn and grow in their knowledge base.

     

    I would also like to know if you know of other universities or colleges that have a program of this type.

           I have seen financial literacy efforts popping up at many colleges throughout the nation.  We partner with the University of MN Duluth on many things, and I have been contacted by other MN colleges to help them begin efforts.  

     

     Additional ways to provide fiscal literacy to students

    Nate Peterson and his team present discussions in classrooms on request. In addition, there are online posts and information flashed on video screens across campus.

    I found some helpful posts available for students online. It was surprising to see suggestions for:

    ·        Periodic money tips and financial news

    ·        Money tip slide show on digital screens

    ·        Maps for activities and  inexpensive fun near campus

     

          

    For more information on the University of Minnesota program go to one of these web addresses:

     

     http://onestop.umn.edu/finances/manage_money/live_like_a_student/

     

    https://www.facebook.com/livelikeastudent?ref=br_tf

     

    Special thanks to Maura Lerner and Nate Peterson for help with this post.

    I suggest incoming University or College students and their families determine whether financial information is available at the site they plan to attend. Hopefully support is available.

     

    Lori Blatzheim is a wife, mother, grandmother, writer, thrift advocate, cable television producer, and retired nurse. She knows that use of Thrift can help people because she has experienced the benefits.

    Are you a Senior? Do you have a friend or relative who is considering retirement or has already retired? Check out this web site: Retire and Renew:

    http://retireandrenew.com

  • Words of a collector

     I may have some pieces that are considered important, but most of the objects are things that evoke a feeling of visual pleasure. I think that part of the pleasure of collecting is to go out and find that great object and then introduce it into your environment."

     

    -James Marinaccio in Art and Antiques October 2001

     

     

    The consequences of collecting

     

    I have been collecting items from estate and home sales for a number of years. Some have presented objects of rarity and beauty. These have included pottery, glass, and costume jewelry.

     

    I have used strategies to find the best sales. Newspaper advertisements used to list sales. Now, the internet has become the best way to find sales.

     

    As a young wife and mother, I talked my neighbor and friend into coming along on my Saturday search for items of interest. We worked together. After assessing the list of sales, we created a map. This helped us save on gas and on time as we travelled about in the car. 

     

    We looked for special types of merchandise, and concentrated on those pieces that made our home more interesting.

     

    We looked for paintings, glass vases, rugs, furniture, pottery and jewelry.

     

    We truly enjoyed seeing and purchasing items of age and merit. We were able to buy used pieces we could never have purchased at retail.  

     

     

    When can collecting impact the family budget?

     

    Although it is lovely to shop and select favorite items, there may be problems. It is one thing to host an older coffee set, and another to find sufficient space to house it.

     

    We may be tempted to spend money on something we will only use occasionally.

     

     

     

    How to thoughtfully attend sales.

     

     

    We finally decided we needed to draft a policy governing what we would purchase. It included the following:

     

    ·        We made a survey of our needs.

    ·        Lists described what was really essential.

    ·        Duplicate items were purchased only when needed.

    ·        Only needed items were purchased.

    ·        All purchased all things with cash.

     

    Did our strategy help?

     

    With time, some things changed.

     

    We started appreciating items we already had. Shopping experiences were discussed.

     

    Former finds were added to the décor of our homes.

     

    We found different activities for Saturday.

     

     

    Lori Blatzheim

     

     

    Lori Blatzheim is a wife, mother, grandmother, writer, thrift advocate, and retired nurse. She knows that use of Thrift can help people because she has experienced the benefits.

    Are you a Senior? Do you have a friend or relative who is considering retirement or has already retired? Check out this web site: Retire and Renew:

    http://retireandrenew.com

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • I no longer shop at membership warehouse clubs

     

    When we were young, my husband and I spent time in large stores which require cards to enter. I remember Fedco, Price Club and a few others. They prepared and presented a lot of items needed by young families. These included clothing, household, stationary, furniture, and groceries come to mind. Their prices were reasonable and below the amount charged by other stores.

    As these clubs faded into our history, we were introduced to Costco and Sam’s. We paid a membership charge. We started spending time in very large buildings offering members low prices on quality merchandise. There were a lot of benefits. We liked most of the products and appreciated the low prices.

    We drove home with very large bundles to a fully prepared residence.

     

    Years later, we find ourselves with fewer people, less need for lodging, an overfilled refrigerator and no need for more household items.

    It appears we no longer require a membership warehouse club.

    Currently we are suffering from too much largess. In view of that, I now purchase food, gasoline, furniture, and household needs at local stores. I no longer drive distances to the membership store. I strive to purchase an amount equal to our needs. 

     

    I have news.

    As we age, we come upon a time when “not so much” is needed, required, or purchased.

    Our memories of large family celebrations and small children recede into a time long ago.

     

    Lori Blatzheim is a wife, mother, grandmother, writer, thrift advocate, and retired nurse. She knows that use of Thrift can help people because she has experienced the benefits.

    Are you a Senior? Do you have a friend or relative who is considering retirement or has already retired? Check out this web site: Retire and Renew:

    http://retireandrenew.com

     

    [update] (2008-01-31)[update]

  • Maps or GPS, which would you choose?

     I was set to write an article about GPS (global positioning system), the worldwide navigation system that uses information received from orbiting satellites. I looked at a variety of devices. They were priced from $100-$300 for a budget version. Considering the price, I didn’t see advantages in owning one.  That’s when a friendly voice cleared my head.

    Enter someone who likes her GPS

    Last night I spoke with my daughter. I discussed with her my plan to write a post about GPS. I had been concerned that people would lose the ability to know where they were, and what was beyond the glass windows.

    My daughter began telling me about benefits she had found from using her GPS. Here are some of the advantages she discovered. She learned that the GPS:

    Guides the driver to maneuver the car through the best possible route and avoid heavy traffic

         Helps locate the vehicle if it is stolen

     

         Helps find a parking spot and locates the vehicle quickly on return.

     

    Sends an alert message if the vehicle deviates from the route.  

    Fnds the nearest emergency center or service station.

     

    Why we haven’t used GPS

    My husband and I have been driving cross country for years. We memorized the states, roads, and distances long ago. When traveling somewhere, we studied the land map and selected a route.

    We tried GPS a few times but decided we did not need all the prompts. My husband had an aversion to having a woman’s voice tell him where to go.

    While traveling, we spent time in different States. We viewed the landscape, learned from people we met, and positioned in our minds the location of the State in our country.

    We marveled at the roads which took us hundreds of miles. Some were two lane local highways and others were wider, newly built, roadways.

    With time, we taught our children to read maps. They viewed lines representing highways and learned to find cities, National Parks, historic sites, oceans, rivers, mountains and our destinations. When older they could calculate distances. 

    I realize that GPS devices will probably become the way to go when travelling.

    Maps may, eventually go out of style. Families will still travel to a variety of sites. Navigation will be assisted by a machine.

    However, I hope people will still teach their children about the States, where they sit on maps, how they connect with other areas, and why it is important to remember the beauty and history of our country. 

    As for me, I will remain a person who reads and appreciates a good map.

     

    Lori Blatzheim is a wife, mother, grandmother, writer, thrift advocate, and retired nurse. She knows that use of Thrift can help people because she has experienced the benefits.

    Are you a Senior? Do you have a friend or relative who is considering retirement or has already retired? Check out this web site: Retire and Renew:

    http://retireandrenew.com

     

    Posts you may find of value:

    http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/tech/news/story/2012-07-03/road-maps-gps-travel/56007828/1

     

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/05/opinion/sunday/is-gps-all-in-our-head.html?_r=0 

     

     

     

  • Senior discounts

    A month ago I read an article in a Minneapolis newspaper. The title was “Do seniors deserve that senior discount?”

    Examples of discounts presented included; movies, restaurant meals, rental cars, airline tickets, hotel rooms, train, bus tickets.

    A comment was made that “most of us (seniors) are doing OK”. A suggestion was made that “maybe we can still help to carry our nation’s burdens.”

    I was stunned and concerned that someone would challenge discounts for seniors. Apparently this is a topic some people are studying. They are exploring statistics on numbers of seniors, income received, and types of discounts available.

     

    Why do businesses offer discounts to seniors?

    The article suggested businesses can make money by targeting seniors. It seems they are the largest and fastest growing market segment.

    I also read that seniors are cheap and that some make frugality a hobby.

     

    I discussed this article with a family member

    We came to these conclusions:

    It is better for a business that seniors visit and spend money at the site.

    Older people may have a flexible schedule not available to others. (They can attend an early show.)

    Shopping by seniors may result in a larger income for the business.

    Older shoppers may buy things not appreciated by a younger audience.

    Seniors may bring those not eligible for a discount, to the business.

     

    Our final thought was, if the business is losing money, the leadership will not offer a discount.

     

    Research on this topic.

     

    Just to make certain this was not the only printed discussion on this topic, I checked the Internet and came up with some additional posts on the topic of senior discounts.

    Below are examples I found. 

    http://50plusseniornewspa.com/news/2012/may/17/my-22-cents-worth-should-seniors-get-discounts/

    http://www.artsjournal.com/worth/2013/05/why-do-seniors-get-discounts/

     

    Lori Blatzheim is a wife, mother, grandmother, writer, thrift advocate, and retired nurse. She knows that use of Thrift can help people because she has experienced the benefits.

    Are you a Senior? Do you have a friend or relative who is considering retirement or has already retired? Check out this web site: Retire and Renew:

    http://retireandrenew.com

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Art Fair, a way to save money and spend a summer day

    You are bored to death. The children want something to do. You check current newspapers and internet to see if any free activities are available.

     

    You see a notice about an Art Fair. You have never been to an Art Fair and you know very little about painting, drawing, sculpture, or anything else which might be presented.

     

     

    What do you think? Why not try attending. It will give you something to do and, after all, it is free!

     

     

    Let’s assume you decide to attend an art fair in your home community or area. You are going to view a lot of things produced by people hoping their work will attract visitors.

     

    You will see many different items, in many different styles. You will decide what you like and what you don’t like. At most art fairs, the creator of the art will be there to speak with you, your family members, and friends. Your group will be able to make comments and ask questions about the art piece.

     

     

    I would like to introduce you what you might see at an Art Fair

     

    I live near Excelsior MN. This city is perched on the side of a very large lake. A piece of land provides a site for community events.

     

    I would like to illustrate what you may find if you attend an art fair.

     

    I plan to do this through photographs. I received permission from the artists to present examples of their work.

     

    They use a lot of different materials.  These include metal and more, wood, paint, fabric,

    mosaic material, camera and lens, glass, copper and wood. 

     

    If you do attend an Art Fair, I hope that you and your group enjoy yourselves. It can be a pleasant experience and an opportunity to learn from the artist.

     

    Art is an entity produced by those who consider it important. It requires thought, practice, and desire to produce something which will satisfy others. Art has no boundaries. It does not belong to one branch of work. It belongs to the creator of the work and the person who owns it.

     

    Lori Blatzheim

     

     

     

    Lori Blatzheim is a wife, mother, grandmother, writer, thrift advocate, and retired nurse. She knows that use of Thrift can help people because she has experienced the benefits.

    Are you a Senior? Do you have a friend or relative who is considering retirement or has already retired? Check out this web site: Retire and Renew:

    http://retireandrenew.com

     

  • Have you ever worn second hand clothes? Have you ever visited a second hand clothing store?

    For many years I have purchased a large number of garments and accessories. Most of these were bought with the help of coupons. Occasionally I have gone to a second hand store to see what was available. I did purchase jewelry and an occasional jacket. I have worn them all.

    It occurred to me that the second hand clothes market and the stores have changed. They have seemed cleaner and more organized. The sales clerks are friendly and go out of their way to guide customers to desired styles.

     

    Where can shoppers find used clothing?

     

    Following an online list of second hand clothing stores in our community, I drove around looking for women’s clothing stores. A Clothes Mentor store was listed. Unfamiliar with the title I decided to check out the store.

     

    First Impressions

    I parked the car and walked towards the store. A banner listing Clothes Mentor crowned the entrance. Windows displayed clothing that I planned to see within. The door was easily reached. It opened to a large grouping of clothes, accessories, shoes, scarves, purses, and jewelry. There were two women at a desk, smiling and asking if I needed help.

    It was fun visiting with the sales staff, and walking around the site. I succeeded in selling a dress from home. Because of their friendliness and helpfulness I asked for an appointment with the owner.

    Two weeks later, I drove to the site and met the owner.

     

    My conversation with Stacey, the owner.

    It didn’t take long for us to get acquainted and begin a conversation.

    I learned that there are several types of second hand stores. These include:

    Large stores offer many types of clothing for men, women and children.

    Consignment stores contain clothing, owned by a non-staff person. This is offered in the store. If it is purchased by a customer, the original owner will receive money.

    Resale stores where an owner presents clothing to the staff of the store. If accepted, the original owner receives cash on the spot!  

     

    Items being sold at Clothes Mentor include clothing, shoes, belts, purses and jewelry. Merchandise is available for sizes 0 –26 plus petite and maternity clothes. The store has numerous stylish and brand-name items. The amount paid for consigned items varies based on condition, style, brand and demand. .

    The staff accepts clothing from well-known companies such as Talbot, Chico’s women’s clothing, Ann Taylor, Banana Republic, Christopher & Banks etc.  The staff may also accept items from Target, Kohl’s, and Penny’s.

    The goal is to accept well-made items, in like new condition as well as unique hard to find items and apparel.

     

    Stacey wanted the following for her Clothes Mentor store:

    • at least 3000 square foot site
    • a place in a strip mall
    • other businesses which would support a women’s clothing store.  

    With time she has added to the list and now asks for items that are:

    ·        one to two years old or new

    ·        currently in style

    ·        in great condition or like new

    ·        color coordinated

    ·        free from damage; stains, rips, holes, snags, broken zipper, or missing buttons

    ·        The staff will purchase clothing from all seasons and present it too shoppers at the appropriate time.

     

    Other aspects of managing a store filled with previously worn clothing.

    Sometimes the staff makes mistakes and the store is left with items which do not sell. If this happens the clothing may be donated to charity.

    The staff will purchase clothing from all seasons and present it too shoppers at the appropriate time.

    Clearance sales are held twice per year. They begin at 50% off and go on to 70% off. The sales are presented on a 3-2-1 format.

     

    Who shops at Clothes Mentor?

     

    This store has a faithful clientele. Women from their early twenties to their eighties frequent the site. Some women come only to sell clothing. Others come to buy the merchandize. There are women who do both.

     

    Dressing Rooms

    A number of dressing rooms are available and customers do use them. The staff prefers returning merchandize to the appropriate area of the store. Although shoppers want to be helpful, the staff knows where each item belongs.

     

    I began this blog with two questions:

    Have you ever worn second hand clothes?

    Have you ever visited a second hand clothing store?

    I can answer these with a “yes.”

     

    I hope that you will consider visiting second hand clothing stores near where you live. By checking out the merchandise you will decide if this is for you. I wish you luck.

     

    Lori Blatzheim

     

    Lori Blatzheim is a wife, mother, grandmother, writer, thrift advocate, and retired nurse. She knows that use of Thrift can help people because she has experienced the benefits.

     

    Would you like to see photos of the interior of the Clothes Mentor store in Eden Prairie, MN?

     

    Go to this web address:

     

    http://retireandrenew.com/?p=1467

     

     

    Posts you might find helpful: 

     http://www.wikihow.com/Sell-Used-Clothing

    What is a buy, sell, trade store?

    http://crossroadstrading.com/buy-sell-trade/how-we-work/

    The following posts discuss wearing second hand clothing. Some deal with vintage or retro clothes.

    http://sociallifeof2ndhandclothes.com/

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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