December 2011 - Posts - Surviving on Shoestrings by Donna Miller
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Surviving on Shoestrings by Donna Miller

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December 2011 - Posts

  • Silver, Gold and Cash vs. Food, Water and Skill

     Author: Donna Miller

      Recently, in a forum of which Millers Grain House is a sponsor, someone posted a question that the basis for asking is found in the current economy and trends. The question is valid as many of us wonder what is ahead.  It went something like this:

    I hear a lot about having cash, silver and gold on hand for the future. Would the current investment not be better spent in another area? A can of beans that cost $.85 now may cost $8.00 after a collaspe. Just speaking for myself I would rather have food, water and toilet paper than valueless cash or glittery metals.

    My hypothesis is that some cash (paper money and coins) along with precious metals such as silver or gold may be needed and appeal to some as legal tender if in the midst of an economic melt-down. However, this question deserves some serious thought as well as much warranted action.

    An investment in something that will sustain your life is far wiser than saving up only gold, silver, the current currency or stock options. The list of real life assets that could easily prove more valuable to sustain life in even tougher economic times than these include (but are not limited to):

    • Water
    • Food
    • Gardening skills
    • Skill to preserve a harvest
    • Wood working
    • Survival skills (fire building, shelter building, etc)
    • Animal husbandry and small livestock
    • Sewing
    •  Anything our ancestors did 200 years ago to establish the land as productive and self sustaining.


    This short beginning list of skills and vital items (and the time investment spent learning, testing and trying them) are far more worthy and look to be the more tangible options than a shiny piece of metal that cannot be eaten or share hope with another desperate person.

    The best way to find out what might really be important would be to ask someone who lived through the Great Depression. With no funds on hand, what was vital to them? We may be surprised.

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Surviving on Shoestrings Radio Show: http://radio.thesurvivalmom.com/category/donna-miller/ Visit our online store at: http://www.millersgrainhouse.com/store There you can sign up for the complimentary newsletter with a free healthy, whole grain recipe and tips on saving money each month.
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